re-workblog:

image

The tech world is rapidly evolving and it’s hard to keep up! To help you keep up to date we’ve made a selection of the last week’s best tech articles you should be reading:

“The problem with past attempts to develop a transparent…

10 notes

extoria:

natashi-san:

reallifescomedyrelief:

viforcontrol:

beautifuloutlier:

gwydtheunusual:

too—weird-to-live:

zafojones:

Circus Tree: Six individual sycamore trees were shaped, bent, and braided to form this.

how the hell do you bend and braid a tree

Actually pretty easy. Trees don’t reject tissue from other trees in the same family. You bend the tree to another tree when it is a sapling, scrape off the bark on both trees where they touch, add some damp sphagnum moss around them to keep everything slightly moist and bind them together. Then wait a few years- The trees will have grown together. You can use a similar technique to graft a lemon branch or a lime branch or even both- onto an orange tree and have one tree that has all three fruits.Frankentrees.

As a biologist I can clearly state that plants are fucking weird and you should probably be slightly afraid of them.

On that note! At the university (UBC) located in town, the Agriculture students were told by their teacher that a tree flipped upside down would die. So they took an excavator and flipped the tree upside down. And it’s still growing. But the branches are now the roots, and the roots are now these super gnarly looking branches. Be afraid.

But Vi, how can you mention that and NOT post a picture? D:

[source]

I am both amazed and horrified of nature as we all should be

Taken directly from the source linked above:

Weeping elm (Ulmus glabra Camperdownii)
Weeping elm. Photo Kai Jacobson/The Ubyssey
Just a few feet away from the Dutch elm is one of its cousins — but looking at the two, you would never know they’re related. This tree is often referred to as the “upside-down tree” by students, as its branches resemble roots. The reason for the unusual shape comes from its cultivation method: rather than sprouting from a seed, this tree grows from a Camperdown elm cutting that’s grafted onto the trunk of a Wych elm.
Tag no. 5844, south pocket garden behind Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

It’s still cool - it’s a cutting grafted onto the trunk of a different species - but not an upside tree.
Please don’t spread misinformation.

extoria:

natashi-san:

reallifescomedyrelief:

viforcontrol:

beautifuloutlier:

gwydtheunusual:

too—weird-to-live:

zafojones:

Circus Tree: Six individual sycamore trees were shaped, bent, and braided to form this.

how the hell do you bend and braid a tree

Actually pretty easy. Trees don’t reject tissue from other trees in the same family. You bend the tree to another tree when it is a sapling, scrape off the bark on both trees where they touch, add some damp sphagnum moss around them to keep everything slightly moist and bind them together. 
Then wait a few years- The trees will have grown together. 

You can use a similar technique to graft a lemon branch or a lime branch or even both- onto an orange tree and have one tree that has all three fruits.

Frankentrees.

As a biologist I can clearly state that plants are fucking weird and you should probably be slightly afraid of them.

On that note! At the university (UBC) located in town, the Agriculture students were told by their teacher that a tree flipped upside down would die. So they took an excavator and flipped the tree upside down. And it’s still growing. But the branches are now the roots, and the roots are now these super gnarly looking branches. Be afraid.

But Vi, how can you mention that and NOT post a picture? D:

image

[source]


I am both amazed and horrified of nature as we all should be

Taken directly from the source linked above:

Weeping elm (Ulmus glabra Camperdownii)

Weeping elm. Photo Kai Jacobson/The Ubyssey

Just a few feet away from the Dutch elm is one of its cousins — but looking at the two, you would never know they’re related. This tree is often referred to as the “upside-down tree” by students, as its branches resemble roots. The reason for the unusual shape comes from its cultivation method: rather than sprouting from a seed, this tree grows from a Camperdown elm cutting that’s grafted onto the trunk of a Wych elm.

Tag no. 5844, south pocket garden behind Irving K. Barber Learning Centre

It’s still cool - it’s a cutting grafted onto the trunk of a different species - but not an upside tree.

Please don’t spread misinformation.

275,965 notes

tastefullyoffensive:

Crazy Ideas That Just Need to Happen Already [via]

Previously: Mind-Boggling Shower Thoughts

289,920 notes

tropicaljustin:

captainjaymerica:

ask-america-stuff:

itsstuckyinmyhead:

Cats and Tumblr

I cant stop laughing.

silverserenades weaponsgradegains

AHAHAHA the hashtag on the last one fucked me up

309,799 notes